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: a good question, and i think the challenge for all of us is to figure of how we balance the need for the deficit that is there for the hospitals. how do we make sure that we talent that right balanc the hospitals need and whether it is the administrators role or down to the key doctors and specialists that need to be trained and need to be there to help our children. the focus that we are doing at children's hospitals is to provide the day the >>> "the communicators" is on location of the seventh annual state of the net conference sponsored by the congressional internet caucus. we will be talking with several of the participants in this conference and we begin with clay shirky come author, professor and thinker about technology and its uses. he's written four books on the internet and technology including his latest, called the surplus and generosity in the connected age. mr. shirky, is the internet browser an antiquated technology? >> it's antiquated in the sense that it is nearing 20-years-old now, and that was changed quickly as they do now. anything 20-years-old and somewhat
at the seventh annual state of the net conference sponsored by the caucus in congress. joining us now is william blair from the massachusetts institute of technology -- leher from the massachusetts institute of technology. what is the communications futures program? >> we work together with industry partners both internationally and domestically to look at issues affecting the internet. the idea is to try to think about technologically aware policy, business strategy, and strategy where technology -- strategy-up where technology. >> what are you thinking about most these days? >> i could spend a lot of time thinking about wireless issues. i come from a regulatory economic research background, so i am especially interested in all of the non-technical sides of policies and how they interact with the internet. how do we ensure a healthy climate for the internet? how might we manage spectrum? these sorts of issues are ones i have been thinking about recently. >> when you graduated from your first college, the university of graduated withou floppy disks, computer labs, and dial-up modems. what did yo
hope that our democratic colleagues will join us. >> here is a look at our prime- time schedule, starting at 7:00 p.m. eastern. the ninth circuit court of appeals hears an oral argument in a challenge to an oregon- based organizations designation as a terrorist organization. then, microsoft chairman bill gates will speak. after that, first lady michelle obama and secretary of state hillary clinton will host the international women of courage awards ceremony. following that, the prime minister of australia. >> this week on "the communicator's," a discussion of policy with the chairman of the house subcommittee on communications. >> greg walden, if you could start us off this week by telling us, what is your legislative agenda for the 112th congress? >>. the numbers we are -- we have a number of issues we are going to take up regarding communications. first of all its net neutrality. obviously, we have been through the hearings and i am sure we can get into that in detail later in the program. second is the process of reform. some reforms have been good income and i am not picking
. >> host: chairman greg walden, if you could start our "communicators" this week by telling us, what is your legislative agenda for the 112th congress? >> guest: we have a number of issues we're going to take up in this session of congress on the communications and telecommunications subcommittee. first of all, we started with a review of what the federal communications commission has done on net neutrality. obviously, our side believes they didn't have the authority, and we've been through the hearings, and i'm sure we can get into that later in the program. second is looking at fcc process and reform. chairman genachowski has put in some reforms, and i'm not picking on this commission. i think over time there are issues that come to the fore, there are processes that have, people have had some criticism about how rule makings move forward at the commission. and surprising commissioners and big changes late at night, kind of what congress was doing for a while in this former chairman of the gop transmission. we tried to change that in our rules. the fact that no two commissioners ca
at the seventh annual state of the net conference sponsored by the internet caucus of congress. joining us now is dr. william lehr of massachusetts institute of technology where he is a researcher on the communications futures program. first of all, dr. lehr, what is the communications futures program? >> >> guest: communications futures program is an attempt to look across the value chain of the internet. so from equipment providers to service providers to application providers and not just in the u.s., but internationally. so we work together, several schools at mit, with industry partners both internationally and domestically to look at various issues confronting the internet. and the idea is to try and think about technologically aware policy and business strategy and business strategy aware technology and sort of try and bridge that gap. >> host: what are you thinking about most these days? >> guest: well, with the internet there's a lot of things to think about. we personally, i spend a lot of time thinking about wireless issues, and i come out of a regulatory economics research backgrou
of the net conference spoon tored by the internet caucus of congress. joining us now is dr. william laer where he's a researcher on the internet futures program. first of all, what is the communication futures program? >> communications future program is an attempt to look across the value chain of the internet, so from equipment providers to service providers to application providers, and not just in the u.s., but internationally. we work together, several schools at mit with industry partners, internationally and domestically on issues confronting the internet and ideas to technology aware business strategy and business strategy aware in technology and bridge that gap. >> what are you thinking about most these days? >> well, with the internet, there's a lot of things to think about. me, personally, i think about wireless issues, and i come out of a regulatory economics research background, so i'm especially interested in all of the sort of nontech any call side of policy and business strategy and how that interarguments with the -- interacts with the internet. how do we ensure healthy
they have raised with us and there are members of both sides saying maybe that is something we have to look at so they can actually talk to each other. and then of course there are issues related to the universal service fund and as you know the federal communications system is working on some proposals they are there on universal service reform. intercarrier compensation and those technical situations and we have members on the subcommittee that have an interest in that. spectrum, who has it? who is using it? who is sitting on it, what are their needs, what is the value, how do we address the public safety need in a way that we can afford? broadband. where are we in the rural. $7 billion was spent in the stimulus or at least obligated. it is all out the door but it isn't all spent and i want to make sure we get our money's worth. are we getting the fiber or are we getting the throughput when it is connected? who is doing the oversight and evaluation there and there will be a host of other issues i am sure as we go forward. >> host: if we could start with the net neutrality issue this week,
connell spoke to the and stated he neededhe to make more leadership. he wants us to reach an agreement in terms of the decisions which we need to make to move us toward a balanced a budget but we need to do it in a thoughtful way. first coming out of this recession in making americans work for the future in helping small businesses create jobs in investing in and for structure which creates good-paying jobs right here in america. >> on "the communicators," the head of the national association of broadcasters. and half an hour that foreign law congressional politics and the federal budget. after that the presence of president of the federal reserve bank of atlanta. >> is become "the communicators" a discussion about issues relating to broadcasters with gordon smith, president ceo of the national association of broadcasters. >> we are pleased to welcome back to "the communicators" gordon smith president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, former senator from oregon of course. senator smith, the n.a.b. is meeting in town right now in washington this week. what is your message to c
royalty issue and how we reconcile mutual dependence of radio e and performers. they need us, we need them, and their market was broken by the internet. people don't buy music anymore, and that's unfortunate. but we don't want to break radio in trying to resolve this. >> host: has free television been broken by the internet? >> guest: no, because of retransmission consent just as cable and satellite argued for payment of their produced content, we asked for the same consideration that when they take our content and put it through their pipes or bounce it off their satellites, we feel like we're owed something, and i think it's important to remember that of all the programming that americans watch, in the majority it is broadcast content. people like to watch things live, and they like the super bowl, they like baseball, they like "24," "the office." all of these things are expensive to produce, and we believe we're deserved to be paid for that so we can keep broadcasting in the very best of content. >> host: well, a republican commissioner of the fcc, robert mcdowell, and the republican ch
. they need us. we need them. their market was broken by the internet. people do not buy music anymore. that is unfortunate. we do not want to break radio in trying to resolve this. >> has three television been broken by the internet? -- has free television been broken by the internet? >> no. the have argued for payment of produced content. we asked for the same consideration. when they take our content and put it through their pipes or bounces off the satellite, we feel we are owed something. of all the programming that the majorityttch, are broadcast content. people like to watch things like. they like super bowl, baseball, "office. of these things are expensive to produce. we believe we deserve to be paid for them to keep broadcasting in the best of content. >> the republican commissioner of the fcc and the republican chairman of the energy and commerce committee have both said that the government should not be regulating between broadcasters and cable television on retransmission. do you agree? >> i do. while there is the rare interruption, the truth of the matter is that 99% of th
that push expenses, unfuned and unsustainable projects on to the rest of us. washington passes the law and expects us to balance the books. one year after the federal health care bill was rammed through congress in partisan vote, we now see it as more to do with expanding controlled by the federal government and action reforming our health care system. the 2700 page legislation simply will not work. it creates a new bureaucracy and could cost us and fewer jobs and lost opportunities. the laws shifts billions on to state government. enrich requirements restrict the governor's ability to manage state programs. that is a prescription for serious problems at the state level where much of this plan must be implemented. the federal health care bill dramatically expands medicaid, which was already growing at unsustainable rates. in virginia alone, state spending on medicaid has grown by 1600% over the past 27 years. the program accounts for 21% of our entire general fund and is projected to grow another 26% between 2012 and 2016. under the federal health care bill virginia will be forced to s
of wireless technology. and that's going to take both tens of billions of dollars in investment to get us there and it's going to require a lot more spectrum. right now people are aware that on their wonderful mobile divisions that they want to stream video, that they want to get on the internet and search with web pages. in many places, they are experiencing their dropped calls. there's a great need for more spectrum and a great need for the capital to invest in the next generation networks. we see that this merger will enable the merge to at&t to do that. so that's good for consumers. >> how is it good for cwa,? >> it's good for workers because right now behave experienced a situation in mitigating circumstance where we've seen declining living standards for working people over the past three decades. a lot of that is tied to the fact that many of our own employees have seen they want to keep unions out of the workplace, not share their profitability with their working population. at&t is an exception to that. atat&t is the largest union employee in america. almost 140,000 of our cwa me
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12